A Tale of Three Falcons

Each spring for the past 19 years, something amazing happens in the concrete jungle of Jersey City. A pair of peregrine falcons takes up residence at the top of a skyscraper; 101 Hudson Street to be exact.

The peregrine falcon historically bred in New Jersey on the cliffs in the Palisades and along the Delaware River. During the 1930s and 1940s, there were approximately 350 pairs of peregrines nesting east of the Mississippi. As the century progressed, the number of nesting pairs rapidly decreased due to multiple factors, including unregulated hunting pressure and the use of DDT. Now, the peregrine falcon is on the state’s endangered list.

Falcon-6-21-19

The remaining female eyase at 101 Hudson Street

Thanks to hard work and conservation efforts, there are now over 20 nesting pairs of falcons  in New Jersey. Two of which you can actually watch thanks to “falcon cams” – one in Jersey City and one in Union City Each year for at least the last 15 years I’ve looked forward to the spring when the Jersey City falcon cam is turned on so we can all watch for egg laying, hatching, and watching those eyases (baby falcons) fledge (take flight) for the first time.

Well, this year something happened that was just shocking to say the least. A few days ago window washers at 101 Hudson sprayed the baby falcons with water, pushing two of the three eyases off the roof of the building. As these two babies had not yet fledged, they both fell. One was rushed to The Raptor Trust for evaluation and treatment. The second went missing for several days. Volunteers scoured the area for days for the second eyase. It was finally found Friday and is also now at The Raptor Trust. The third eyases was found at a lower level and was returned to the nest box on the roof.

Viewers of the falcon cam could only watch in horror as all this took place.
According to reports, building management was finally reached and the window washers were escorted off the premises. New Jersey Fish and Wildlife is investigating the entire event.

This entire sad event has shocked the entire bird watching community, as the Jersey City Falcon Cam has a world-wide following. I remember back when I first discovered “the cam” and sharing it with a friend, colleague, and fellow bird lover. As word spread about the falcon cam, other colleagues would check in on the falcon family throughout the day. As member of the IT team, and when Internet access was at a premium, I was supposed to make sure access was for work purposes only. However, when it was “falcon cam time,” I never seemed to be able to catch anyone using the Internet improperly. Maybe because I wasn’t looking very hard.

I hope the two window washers are, at the very minimum, disciplined and the rest of the employees in the building are educated about the endangered birds that live on the roof. These are special birds that need to be protected. The more people that know they are there, the better so we can all help protect them.

If you have never checked out any of the falcon cams, I hope you do!

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Planning on Fishing? Make sure to Get a License

Fishing season opens this weekend in New Jersey; a wonderful time of year! My husband and I just love getting out to the awesome open spaces all around New Jersey and fly fishing different fresh water locations. There is one important step many people skip, however. Buying a New Jersey fishing license.

Rockaway Borough

I can’t believe the number of anglers I see out fishing without a license. I also see plenty of people with their chum buckets taking tons of fish that shouldn’t be removed. Sadly, many of these anglers (and I use that term loosely) do not know the regulations, take whatever they like, and often, leave trash behind. When these locations are over-fished, it takes a long time for them to come back and get healthy again.

Every year my husband and I make sure to purchase our fishing licenses and display them properly as required by law when we are out fishing. We even purchase the trout stamp, even though we don’t harvest fish. Why you might ask? Let me explain.

The Division of Fish and Wildlife works hard to protect our open spaces, which includes stocking fish, checking licenses during hunting and fishing seasons, and offering education programs for adults and children. Fees collected from licenses help to continue the various programs conducted by Fish and Wildlife.

Conservation Officers are spread very thin throughout the state. It is on us to be caretakers of the resources in New Jersey.  If you see someone taking part in illegal behavior, such as poaching or other “wildlife crimes,” contact Operation Game Thief Hotline at 1-855-OGT-TIPS. If you see any ENVIRONMENTAL emergencies, call the 24 hr. DEP HOTLINE at 1-877-WARN-DEP.

And if you are going to go fishing, spend the money and get your license. Fish legally. If you see trash when you are out, pick it up and carry it out. Try and help out where you can and leave the space better than how you found it. Be a good steward of our open spaces.

Why I love New Jersey

My husband and I were watching a television show about real estate in Montana. One couple was planning a move from California to Montana. Now, when most people think of Big Sky Country, they imagine the open prairie, cowboys, and wood cabins. Instead of embracing the lifestyle, they were trying to shoehorn California living into their new house. They obviously shouldn’t have left California. That’s where their heart is.

That’s kind of like how I feel about New Jersey.

Frankford-Cemetery

Frankford Cemetery in black and white by Lisaann VanBlarcom Permunian.

I am often asked a simple question. “Why would you EVER want to stay in New Jersey?”

When my husband and I were married there very were few things that were non-negotiable. One of those non-negotiable items is that I would NEVER move out of New Jersey.

“Why?”

New Jersey is my home. I was born in Columbus Hospital in Newark and spent over 30 years in Belleville. When a move needed to take place, we stayed close by in Nutley until we could decide on our next move. While it may sound crazy, going to the next town over from Belleville was tough. I also felt like I had betrayed my beloved Belleville by moving to our rival town. Two years later, we moved again. Instead of town-to-town, we moved county-to-county. Again, I almost had a nervous breakdown.

As my regular readers know, I don’t deal well with change. I know people who have moved across the country and half-way around the world. Me? I move from Essex County to Morris County and I could barely handle it. I’m a Jersey Girl through and through. I would’ve been very happy to stay in my house on Irving Street for the rest of my life.

Where else can you be at an awesome beach and then the mountains within a two hour drive

Rutt's Hut

A typical meal at the Jersey famous Rutt’s Hut.

in the same state? Have the best REAL Italian and REAL Portuguese cooking in the same city? I can go fly fishing in Walpack or grab a cheese steak at Seaside Heights. You want a great deep fried hot dog? I know the place. Oh, and I don’t pump my own gas.

Some people see Newark Airport and the Turnpike. Me? I see important places that played key roles in the birth of our nation. We are tough. If you are from Jersey, you need to be tough to fight off all the stupid stereotypes from those horrible television shows which I will not name.

So will I travel? Sure. But I will always come home to my New Jersey.

Injured peregrine falcon released into wild

For those of you not familiar, the peregrine falcon is making a great comeback in New Jersey. This raptor was close to extinction in North America in the mid-20th century due to the use of DDT and other Chlorinated Hydrocarbon pesticides which caused their egg shells to become thin and crack under the weight of the parents on the nest. Thankfully, those chemicals were outlawed in the early 1970s.

Since then, there has been a great effort to bring the peregrine falcon back from the brink.

peregrine falcon

(Credit: Sallie Graziano | for NJ.com)

One of the organizations that has helped rehabilitate these amazing creatures when they are injured is the Raptor Trust. This week another patient from the Trust was released back into the wild. A second-year male that was discovered injured in Roxbury in November was released over Spruce Run Reservoir.

 

The peregrine falcon is an amazing creature that can reach speeds up to 175 miles per hour. One of my favorite sites to check out this time of year is the Jersey City Falcon Cam by Conserve Wildlife Foundation of New Jersey. I really recommend you check it out. You will not be disappointed!

Both of these organization rely on donations. If you are able to, I am sure they would appreciate your support.