“Down the Shore” – Part Two in a Series

The Jersey Shore encompasses over 140 miles of beautiful coastline. Famous for its boardwalks, arcades, and amusement piers, each shore town has its own unique vibe. Seaside Heights, which developed a bad reputation thanks to a terrible television show, is popular with teenagers and young twenty-somethings, while Wildwood Crest is more popular with families. The shore region is made up to five different counties – Ocean, Atlantic, Cape May, Middlesex, and Monmouth.

Now I will say there is a “love/hate” relationship between the full-time residents of South Jersey and the seasonal visitors of North Jersey. Seasonal visitors, often called “BENNYs” (which stands for Brooklyn/Bayonne, Elizabeth, Newark, New York), are considered rude, litter the beaches, and generally act like idiots. As a life-long North Jersey resident, I’ve seen “BENNY behavior” first hand and it is embarrassing. NJ.com even posted an article awhile back about how to not be a BENNY. At the same time, however, the summer months play a key role in the economy of these shore towns by visitors spending a lot of money on vacation, which creates jobs,  generates tax income (via crazy parking costs and tickets), and other positive local contributions. When Hurricane Sandy destroyed many of these shore towns, BENNYs (and their money) were welcomed with open arms. Quickly, however, it returned to “BENNYs go home.” If you don’t act like an ass, for the most part, visitors are treated well.

If you ask most Jersey residents, North Jersey and South Jersey are practically considered two separate states, and at one point in history, New Jersey was two separate colonies. The so-called “Central Jersey” doesn’t really exist.

Nevertheless, the Jersey Shore has a fabled and rich history.

Many people today are unaware of the role New Jersey, and especially the Raritan Bay shore, played in the lives of many pirate legends in the late l7th and early I8th centuries. The waters between Sandy Hook and New York City were infested with pirates and French privateers. Blackbeard raided farms and villages near what is today Middletown, and Captain Morgan often visited the area.¹ To this day, there are many who still search the Jersey Shore for the hidden gold of these fabled pirates.

GATE-Sandy-Hook-Lighthouse-websmall

The 250-year-old Sandy Hook Lighthouse. 
NPS / JERRY KASTEN, Volunteer-In-Parks

The barrier island of Sandy Hook, part of what is known as “The Higlands,” has a long history that predates the formation of the United States. The oldest route to the eastern coast of the United States is the Minisink Trail which started on the upper Delaware River, came through northern New Jersey and ended at the Navesink River. Navesink means “good fishing spot” in the native tongue at the time. The trail was used by Native Americans, such as the Algonquin and Lenni Lenapi tribes. They came from all over New Jersey to spend the summer fishing and finding clams. The Newasunks, Raritans, and Sachem Papomorga (or Lenni Lenapis) were the most prevalent tribes and stayed the longest. These were the tribes which mostly traded with early settlers.² Richard Hartshorne purchased a 2,320-acre tract of land from the Native Americans which provided him with control of nearly all of Sandy Hook and Highlands which was then called “Portland Poynt.” Hartshorne and his family became the first permanent settlers of the area.² Built in 1764 to help reduce shipwrecks, Sandy Hook is home to the oldest operating lighthouse in America and a National Historic Landmark. A primary mission of the fort was the defense of New York Harbor. From 1874 to 1919, Sandy Hook also served as the U.S. Army’s first proving ground for testing new weapons and ordnance.³ The 1,665-acre area of Sandy Hook became part of the National Park Service in 1975 after the Army deactivated Fort Hancock. Today it is a beautiful area full of wildlife, historical buildings, great beaches, and of course that important lighthouse.

Before Atlantic City was known as “the little sister of Las Vegas,” it was known for its four miles of boardwalk, built in 1870. Since 1921, it has been home to the Miss America pageant. In 1853, the first commercial hotel, the Belloe House, was built at the intersection of Massachusetts and Atlantic Avenues.4

So as you can see, the Jersey Shore has a wonderful history. I hope you check back for my next post in this series.

Sources:

1: http://weirdnj.com/stories/mystery-history/captain-kidd/

2: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Highlands,_New_Jersey

3: http://www.visitnj.org/city/sandy-hook

4: http://www.cityofatlanticcity.org/about.aspx

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Memorial Day Events 2017

MemorialDayMemorial Day weekend is upon us. While everyone enjoys an extra day off and barbecues, it is important to remember what the day is really about – remembering those who paid for our freedom with their lives. There are a number of events throughout the state where you can pay respect to these men and women we should never forget.

Memorial Day Ceremony at NJ Vietnam Veteran’s Memorial:
The annual ceremony will take place at 11:00 a.m. on Monday. In addition to honoring our Veterans, five Vietnam Veterans will be inducted into the “In Memory Program.” Lt. Governor Kim Guadagno will be the Keynote Speaker and musical entertainment by Sandra Ward. The Museum will remain open until 2:00 PM following the ceremony.

Fleet Week at Liberty State Park:
May 28, 2017; 10:00 AM until 05:00 PM
1 Audrey Zapp Dr.
Liberty State Park
Jersey City, NJ
Event is free and open to the public.
This family event features performances by the U.S. Coast Guard Silent Drill Team, the U.S. Navy Band and the U.S. Marine Corps band.  Attendees will also get to experience parachute, helicopter, and search and rescue demonstrations by the Navy and Coast Guard. Military tactical vehicles, a U.S. Navy dive tank. More exhibits will also be on display throughout the day along with kids activities, and more.

Bedminster Memorial Day Parade:
The parade will begin at 10am at the old Bedminster school on the corner of Elm St & Lamington Rd. A parade will follow down Lamington Rd, a ½ mile to the Far Hills ceremony which will take place at approximately 10:45 at the municipal building on the corner of Prospect St & Peapack Rd. (across from the fairgrounds). After the ceremony we will be serving hot dogs and refreshments in the fairgrounds.

Livingston Memorial Day Parade:
This year’s Memorial Day services will start at 9:30 am, Monday, May 29, 2017 with a ceremonial service at the Oval to commemorate those who have died defending the United States. At 10:00 am, after the ceremony, the parade will start on S. Livingston Avenue and will end at Congressional Way. In the event of inclement weather the Ceremonial Service will be held at the LHS Auditorium.

Oakland Memorial Day Parade:
The annual Memorial Day Parade and Ceremony, sponsored by the American Legion and the Borough of Oakland, will be held on Sunday, May 28th, 2017 beginning at 1:00 PM at Grove Street and Ramapo Valley Road. The parade will close with a ceremony in Veterans Park. Complimentary food and refreshments will be served at the American Legion Post at 65 Oak Street immediately following the parade.

Memorial Day Weekend Fireworks:
Sunday, May 28, 8:00 p.m. – 10:00 p.m.
Asbury Park Boardwalk
Ocean Avenue Between Asbury and Sunset Avenue
Asbury Park, New Jersey
For viewers who want to get in on a private viewing, The Mezzanine Room & Balcony of the iconic Paramount Theatre will be open to the public for a special birds-eye-view of the 2017 Memorial Day Fireworks, complete with music provided by a favorite Asbury Park DJ. Doors open at 8:00 p.m. and fireworks will begin at approximately 9:00 p.m. There will be a cash bar for guests 21 & up. All ages are welcome, (please note that children must be accompanied by an adult). Standing room only. This event will take place weather permitting. Full refunds will be issued if the event is cancelled due to weather.

NNJ Veterans Memorial Cemetery:
Memorial Day Service
Monday, May 29
11:00 a.m.
75 North Church Road, Sparta

Why I love New Jersey

My husband and I were watching a television show about real estate in Montana. One couple was planning a move from California to Montana. Now, when most people think of Big Sky Country, they imagine the open prairie, cowboys, and wood cabins. Instead of embracing the lifestyle, they were trying to shoehorn California living into their new house. They obviously shouldn’t have left California. That’s where their heart is.

That’s kind of like how I feel about New Jersey.

Frankford-Cemetery

Frankford Cemetery in black and white by Lisaann VanBlarcom Permunian.

I am often asked a simple question. “Why would you EVER want to stay in New Jersey?”

When my husband and I were married there very were few things that were non-negotiable. One of those non-negotiable items is that I would NEVER move out of New Jersey.

“Why?”

New Jersey is my home. I was born in Columbus Hospital in Newark and spent over 30 years in Belleville. When a move needed to take place, we stayed close by in Nutley until we could decide on our next move. While it may sound crazy, going to the next town over from Belleville was tough. I also felt like I had betrayed my beloved Belleville by moving to our rival town. Two years later, we moved again. Instead of town-to-town, we moved county-to-county. Again, I almost had a nervous breakdown.

As my regular readers know, I don’t deal well with change. I know people who have moved across the country and half-way around the world. Me? I move from Essex County to Morris County and I could barely handle it. I’m a Jersey Girl through and through. I would’ve been very happy to stay in my house on Irving Street for the rest of my life.

Where else can you be at an awesome beach and then the mountains within a two hour drive

Rutt's Hut

A typical meal at the Jersey famous Rutt’s Hut.

in the same state? Have the best REAL Italian and REAL Portuguese cooking in the same city? I can go fly fishing in Walpack or grab a cheese steak at Seaside Heights. You want a great deep fried hot dog? I know the place. Oh, and I don’t pump my own gas.

Some people see Newark Airport and the Turnpike. Me? I see important places that played key roles in the birth of our nation. We are tough. If you are from Jersey, you need to be tough to fight off all the stupid stereotypes from those horrible television shows which I will not name.

So will I travel? Sure. But I will always come home to my New Jersey.

Bald Eagle Rescue in Tuckerton

This past week, local residents, wildlife enthusiasts, the Mercer County Wildlife Center, Tri-State Bird Rescue, and Ben Wurst, Habitat Program Manager came together in a tricky bald eagle rescue attempt. You can watch the amazing rescue video and read the entire story on the Conserve Wildlife Blog.

On Tuesday, February 17th, the call came in that two bald eagles were stuck in a tree and appeared to be injured. A local resident on the scene knew someone who worked for AC Electric who had a truck with a cherry picker on it. Ben went up in the cherry picker to rescue the two eagles. Unfortunately, one had already died, but their talons were interlocked and they were precariously hanging from a tree limb.

Ben wound up using a hand saw to cut the limb to bring down the two eagles. It took three grown men to get the talons separated in order to save the remaining live eagle. Ben then transported the eagle to the Mercer County Wildlife Center and met with Director Diane Nickerson.

Dr. Erica Miller, a leading expert in bald eagle care and rehabilitation, sutured up a wound on the bird’s leg and found several fractures in the other leg. The bird was treated and transported to Tri-State Bird Rescue & Research, Inc. in Delaware for further care.

While this story doesn’t have a happy ending, it does show the lengths New Jerseyans will go to protect our precious wildlife.