NJ State of the Arts

It’s been awhile since I posted. Like many, life has been full of challenges as of late, but I’m doing my best to pull myself out of this slump. I’ll spare you all the details.

It is important to look for inspiration in times of crisis. And while there has been much sadness, there has certainly been much inspiration around us. Some of it comes from the compassion of our healthcare workers; some from the tenacity of our front-line workers; for me, a lot of it comes from the beauty in nature and the art that surrounds us.

Enter State of the Arts.

This wonderful program is presented on PBS and is a co-production of the New Jersey State Council on the Arts and Stockton University. For the last 40 years, State of the Arts has told the stories of creativity in New Jersey. We are lucky to have such a wonderfully active community of artists, musicians, dancers, performers, and more in the Garden State and sadly not enough people are aware of it. State of the Arts works to bring these brilliant people into the light.

I look forward to every new episode and enjoy going back and watching my favorite segments over again, as well as learning more about the artists presented in each short.

A favorite recent short is “Kea’s Ark;” the story of self-taught engineer Kea Tawana from the Central Ward of Newark, who build the skeleton of a massive ark from found objects in her community during the mid-1980s. Having been born in Newark and growing in the next town over of Belleville, I found this story particularly fascinating. It also shows how important it is to share a story like this. I lived approximately 15 minutes away and had no idea this amazing structure was even erected.

I also draw great inspiration from Kea’s self-taught story. As someone who never had any formal art training beyond piano lessons as a child, I always felt I had an artist’s soul, but I’ve always been afraid to share and explore it. Kea’s story is a good reminder that you don’t need a formal education to cultivate and share your creativity. You just need to be willing to try.

I hope you will check out this amazing series on PBS. It will certainly feed your inner artist as well as teach you more about the creative people and places in our great state.

Italian Heritage in New Jersey: Dr. Steve Adubato

A modern-day New Jersey native of Italian descent I feel is deserving of recognition is Steve Adubato, Ph.D. He is someone I have admired since I was a teenager. Born in Newark, he was the youngest state legislator in the New Jersey General Assembly at age 26. Dr. Adubato earned both his master’s and Doctor of Philosophy degree in mass communication from Rutgers.

Steve Adubato, Ph.D.
Credit: steveadubato.org

I remember watching his program Caucus New Jersey on public access television when I was young. He asked probing and thoughtful questions and was always able to get a response, unlike what often happens in politics and reporting today.

Now he is an individual with a national presence. He has television shows, a podcast, and is often a guest speaker at institutions of higher learning across the country, including my alma mater, Seton Hall University, where he serves as a Buccino Leadership Institute Fellow and is teaching a master class in the spring 2020 semester.

With a focus on leadership and communication, his most recent book, Lessons in Leadership, Dr. Audobato focuses on self-awareness, empathy, and how to be a leader at home and work.

He currently anchors three television series produced by the Caucus Educational Corporation (CEC); State of Affairs, One-on-One, and Think Tank. They are available on multiple platforms, including PBS, NJTV online, and YouTube.

Dr. Adubato has taught many to think critically as well as ask important questions on behalf of his fellow New Jerseyans. He has certainly made his home state, and his home county of Essex, proud.